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Tag: studio start-up

Opening a Dance Studio: Planning the Grand Opening

opening a dance studio

Now that you’re about to get started opening a dance studio, you have to begin planning your initial marketing strategies to let the public know that you now exist. How will you get the word out? How will people know that you are a credible institute of dance? Before mentioning any detailed strategies, the most important thing to realize is that the more time you have for planning and marketing your opening timeline, the more successful your efforts will prove.

Here are some strategies that worked well for The Dance Exec’s Studio during its opening:

“Coming Soon” Sign

Placing a “Coming Soon…” banner over the doors at the soon-to-be studio site (which stresses importance of location, visibility, and neighboring businesses)

Set Up Tables Around Town

Set up tables at nearby locations to promote your coming location. When The Dance Exec’s Studio was opening, tables were set-up at a fun park (putt-putt, go-karts, arcade games, etc), nearby preschools, local swim clubs, nearby churches and local country clubs on a regular basis. The studio set up at any and every community festival and event possible. These events are frequently free, and you can create an extensive prospective client database by gathering emails and phone numbers with a raffle or give away (e.g. enter for a chance to win a free month of classes, just give us your email!).

Some places that may not work well for setting up a table (local schools), may be willing to put out flyers or business cards advertising your services.  Our philosophy is that it never hurts to ask.

Free Demo Classes

Be prepared to give lots of free demo classes! You must be so confident in your service that everyone wants to buy-in. Visit as many places as possible and show them what you have to offer. Very few places will refuse an offer for a free demo class.  If you do not ask to offer a sample class, it is unlikely they will ask you.  Do not be afraid to put yourself out there.

Any time you are in the public, you must be prepared. Before beginning your marketing, follow-up information should be ready.

Prior to beginning your marketing / grand opening announcement efforts, make sure the following are fully functional and ready to go:

  • A website
  • Phone number
  • Class offerings/schedule information to give to people
  • Business Cards
  • Flyers & Information Sheets
  • Studio T-Shirts with Logo (not required, but encouraged)

It is incredibly important to remember that if people are contacting you, you need to be ready to respond. Be prepared to answer the phone and respond to emails in a prompt, efficient manner. Show your prospective clients that your level of customer service is exceptional from their initial interaction with you.

We also recommend planning a large Grand Opening event, which can be the centralized theme of your early marketing efforts.

At your Grand Opening event, this is your first time officially introducing yourself as a business entity to your community and prospective clients. The studio should be as close to completion as possible and should be clean and in neat order. Show people how organized you are from the very first day.

The Grand Opening event should include any of the following options:

  • Complimentary Sample Classes for a variety of ages, featuring a variety of your instructors
  • Facility Tours (we recommend having a tour script that highlights the studio and its best features so that everyone visiting the studio receives the same, standardized information)
  • Face Painting/ Balloon Animals/ Craft Stations / etc.
  • Food
  • Separate Registration area, so interested clients can be efficiently and sufficiently addressed
  • Separate Shoe Fitting/Merchandise Purchasing area

At the end of The Dance Exec’s Studio’s Grand Opening, we had over 100 students registered. This number will vary significantly based on where you are opening and your marketing efforts. When the studio began, it began from scratch. There was no taking of half of a student base of a nearby studio, or any of the “ick factor” stories you often hear associated with the opening of a new studio.

If students choose The Dance Exec’s Studio, it is because we are building a reputation and are providing the best possible experience for each and every one of our clientele. As a Studio Owner, you have a huge responsibility—in the world of dance studios, there is not a quality control department or corporate headquarters where we can send dissatisfied clients; rather, dance studio owners are all-encompassing title holders.

Be ready for every scenario possible. One of The Dance Exec’s Studio’s greatest mentors and advisers gave us this initial advice,

“You are now a business owner first, and an artist second.”

Take that advice, and enjoy the ride that is opening a dance studio!

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Dance Studio Employee Handbook: Part 2 of the Dance Staff Management Guide

dance studio employee handbook

If you choose to hire a person, it is important to bring them back to your studio to review your expectations and discuss details in a staff orientation session. In the orientation, you should discuss three things:

  1. Expectations for Professionalism
  2. Accountability & Preparedness
  3. Details of the Working Agreement

Expectations for Professionalism

You must never assume that people will understand your standards for professionalism. Rather, you must detail a code of behavior and work ethics that specifically addresses your expectations and consequences for non-compliance. Our society is constantly evolving, and you must ensure that your code of ethics and professionalism evolves with the trends of society.

Each year, The Dance Exec’s Studio takes time to review the values, policies, and guidelines for our entire staff. Topics addressed range from curriculum to dress to behavior to attendance and more. Your expectations should be explicit and detailed. Consequences for non-compliance of expectations should be discussed, too.

As time evolves, your expectations for professionalism may evolve. You should constantly evaluate and update your expectations to make sure your studio complies with the highest standards of the dance industry.

For example, in the middle of the 2011-2012 season, the studio saw a need to implement a new social media policy to alleviate grievances that were arising from student/staff online “friendships” and interactions (the grievances were petty, but based on conversations in the academic environment, it seemed that the issue could further spiral out of control and needed to be addressed).

The studio spent a couple of weeks determining the best course of action and took staff opinions and feelings into consideration, too.

Ultimately, an email was sent out to the staff to address our new social media policy (which states that instructors will not “friend” students on social media sites). This new, professional policy was complimented with a follow-up email to the studio parents.

Both emails were very similar and described the benefits of the evolved policy to the respective targeted audience. The studio did not receive one complaint regarding the new policy. If you are consistently on the cutting-edge of business developments and you approach your choices as bettering the business, you will never go wrong.

Set your standards for professionalism and do not feel ashamed for what you deem appropriate/inappropriate. Be clear and concise in your expectations and you will succeed.

Accountability & Preparedness / Details of Working Agreement

In addition to professionalism within the workplace, high standards of accountability and preparedness are essential to creating a staffing model that contributes to the culture of your studio. Again, your accountability and preparedness expectations should be set forth prior to hiring and consequences should be standardized in case a staff member chooses to not follow your requirements.

How can you make sure that your staff members are consistently maintaining the standards set forth by your studio? At The Dance Exec’s Studio, a detailed, written working agreement (this is not a contract) is provided to all of our employees at the beginning of each season. It is imperative that you constantly renew your written material since new issues arise, improvements are made, etc. Never become complacent in your standards.

In your dance studio employee handbook, you should include expectations of staff during their employment term, their terms of employment (at-will employee, contract employee, etc.), consequences of breaking the terms of employment, and their pay for their agreement period. The staff member and the studio owner(s) should sign off on the agreement, and the staff member should initial each clause in the agreement.

Topics in your dance studio employee handbook should include:

  • An Employee Handbook Acknowledgement
  • Terms & Conditions of Employment
    • Employment Status
    • Studio Curriculums & Confidentiality
    • Client Records
    • Pay Agreement & Procedure
  • Employment Expectations
    • Call Time
    • Appropriate Attitude
    • Apparel Recommendations
    • Class Structure & Preparation
    • Communication Protocol
    • Rewards Systems/ Behavioral Protocol
    • Zero Tolerance Items
  • Studio Housekeeping
    • Parking
    • Yearly Calendar (with pay information re: holidays, etc.)
    • Special Events (expectations and compensation for recitals, competitions, etc.)
  • Attendance Requirements
  • Professionalism & Workplace Values
  • Performance Appraisal
    • Appropriate On & Off-Site Studio Affiliated Behavior
    • Expectations for Evaluation & Sample Evaluation Form
    • Detailed Information Regarding Performance Review
  • Safety Awareness
  • Disciplinary Action
  • Yearly Calendar/Curriculum Guide
  • Payroll Calendar

The Dance Exec also recommends consulting an attorney to make sure your terms of employment and rules are legal within the laws of your state.

In regards to legal advice and staff, within the dance studio industry, there is a lot of conversation and debate regarding labeling dance studio instructors as independent contractors versus employees. At The Dance Exec’s Studio, the regular, in-studio staff are labeled as employees since we dictate their schedules, classes, etc. If the studio brings in a guest artist, then he/she is considered an independent contractor.

Whatever you choose to do at your studio, make sure it fits within the bounds of the law. (Incorrectly labeling employees as contractors can lead to an IRS audit and back payment of payroll taxes.)

Ultimately, you have to view yourself as a business entity and you must approach every decision from that same perspective. Be sure to consult an attorney to make sure you are handling your staff’s finances properly. Do not cut payroll corners. If you handle everything the correct way, then you are laying the foundation to protect yourself and your business for years to come.

Systemizing Staffing Conflicts

In a perfect world, staffing conflicts, mishaps, and broken rules would not occur. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect and neither is human nature. At some point in the time, an incident will occur that will concern or involve a staff member, and the way you choose to handle it will make all the difference in the world to you, your professional relationships, and your business.

Your consequential/disciplinary plan for your staff should be so detailed that there are no surprises. If a staff member is not conforming to your written expectations, they should be reprimanded in an appropriate way.

This is not to say that all reprimands should be negative. Joining a studio’s culture is a learning process, and often times, you can turn a conflict into a learning experience. Most staff members will appreciate your guidance and will learn and develop from your feedback.

For each incident that occurs, you should have levels of consequence, documentation forms, and staff file folders to track any disciplinary actions. Please note that all forms must be signed and dated by the staff member and the studio owner(s). Implementing a standardized system alleviates the emotions involved with disciplinary action, and better protects you and your business.

 

Ready for the next step? You can see the third part of the Dance Studio Management Guide here:

Dance Teacher Evaluations and Replacing a Dance Teacher: Part 3

You can also revisit Part One of the Dance Studio Management Guide here.

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Dance Teacher Evaluations and Replacing a Dance Teacher: Part 3 of the Dance Staff Management Guide

dance teacher evaluations

An important method of keeping your staff on track is evaluating their teaching methods in class via announced and unannounced observations. Using a systematic evaluation system, constructive critiques can be beneficial in the following ways:

  • Helping staff members grow as teachers
  • Creating consistency within the classroom, and
  • Providing tips for professional improvement

At The Dance Exec’s Studio, each staff member has a folder with an evaluation sheet for each pay period. Some topics addressed include:

  • If classes are starting/ending on time
  • If classes are following the curriculums and guidelines set forth by the studio
  • If in-class questions are being addressed in an appropriate manner
  • If instructors are showing equal treatment to all students in class

Any other policy issues and requested days off are documented, too.

Prior to receiving a check for the pay period, the staff member and owner sign off on the evaluations.

This tracking system is advantageous in several ways:

  1. It holds staff members accountable for their actions.
  2. It serves as a coaching system and notates improvement or regression in patterns of behavior.
  3. It can be used to reward staff members that are on task.
  4. It serves as documentation for potential cases of staff dismissal.

Every studio should maintain some regular system of documentation and evaluation. Your staff is integral to the success of your business, and employees that are committed to fulfilling your vision will be respectful, sensitive, and open to the constructive coaching. At the end of the day, it will ultimately improve your business and will eliminate staff members that are not invested in your culture and business.

In addition to evaluations, in-service opportunities are valuable to staff, too. You may choose to take staff to conventions, or you may go to conventions, offer the staff notes and have them take a brief quiz for a reward (gift card, etc.), or bring knowledgeable guest artists into your studio. With any career, continuing education is integral in maintaining current standards within a respective industry.

As a studio owner, you must ensure that you are on the cutting edge trends of the industry, and in turn, it is your responsibility to keep your staff informed while giving them opportunities to learn and grow.

Please remember that everyone is replaceable. The idea has been reiterated numerous times, but it cannot be reiterated enough.

At The Dance Exec’s Studio, eight staff members were dismissed within the first three seasons. While that number may seem relatively high, the bottom line is that the studio has high expectations that are non-negotiable. Before opening the dance studio, it was decided that the studio would operate by the philosophy that “every single person is replaceable.” A person would only remain on staff if they bought into the culture the studio aimed to create.

Along the way, the studio has learned to spot red flags that indicate whether a person may or may not be a great candidate for the studio. The studio has also implemented standardized interviewing procedures and strategies that generally work in identifying employees that are optimal for the studio.

Based on prior experience in studios, the workplace atmosphere often becomes too friendly, too personal, and too casual. Often, this can result in hanging on to “dead weight”, or employees that are no longer interested or invested in your business. Studio owners refuse to fire the dead weight because of fear of repercussion or fear of detriment to the personal relationship, and the cycle becomes deadly to your business.

If you take nothing else away from these recommendations, please understand that keeping toxic employees as part of your staff is detrimental to your business. This vicious cycle can affect student retention, new student registration, and the overall well-being of your dance studio.

There is a lot of interest surrounding firings because it is never an ideal situation. Ultimately, every decision you make should be in the best interest of your business. Below are some case studies that detail The Dance Exec’s choice to let employees go:

Case Study #1
The Dance Exec’s Studio hired an instructor for the first summer session, and, as a result, the instructor was asked to teach at our Grand Opening celebration. The instructor arrived 30 minutes late to the Grand Opening (without any legitimate reason), and as a result, was dismissed.  First impressions are a time when an employee is trying their hardest to impress you, and as demonstrated by the employee’s lack of regard to timeliness, it was evident that this employee would not be an optimal fit for the studio’s culture.

Case Study #2
The Dance Exec’s Studio had an instructor that over-shared personal details and announced inappropriate comments in the lobby. For example, she announced that our 6 and 7-year-old competitive team needed to be dressed in “sexier” costumes. This instructor also took choreography from conventions and competitions and claimed it as her own. Since this did not fit into the culture of the studio, she was not rehired for the following session.

Case Study #3
The Dance Exec’s Studio had an instructor that decided she finished teaching class ten minutes prior to the actual end of class (and, this was the last class of the night and the instructor had closing responsibilities). The instructor left the studio, leaving her students under the supervision of another instructor. Since negligence is a zero tolerance issue, the instructor was contacted for dismissal. The instructor said she was “over” teaching and quit.

Case Study #4
This case study was undoubtedly the most difficult dismissal because the employee was a personal friend. Over several months, the employee’s energy had dwindled. Her attitude was affecting the business and its clientele. Students were quitting because of this teacher. The first inclination was to fire her nine months before the actual firing occurred, but the Business Manager advocated her loyalty and kept encouraging additional chances.

As the months passed, the detriment of having her on staff was evident. The dismissal was difficult, but, ultimately, it was worth it. In the weeks following this dismissal, several parents came forward and stated their children’s love for dance had been rejuvenated; in fact, many of these parents mentioned that they were going to pull their students from the program because the students had lost their passion. Because of this experience, the importance of trusting your first instincts was learned; it is important to take action sooner rather than later.

Letting Staff Go

Of course, along the way, there have been many wonderful instructors that have chosen to venture on to other endeavors. (We also have some instructors that have been with us from the very beginning.) As a business, you have to respect and encourage people’s personal development and realize that if they do not want to be a part of your business (or cannot continue to be a part of your business), you should not force them.

You must reiterate and live by the philosophy that “everyone is replaceable.” At the end of the day, over reliance on one person or feeling inoperable without a person can lead to situations that will harm your business. This is your business, and you are the only person it needs to operate successfully. You must take every measure possible to protect yourself and your investment.

When a staff member is no longer an asset to your business, you must remove them from your staff roster. If you have a staffing conflict disciplinary system in place, you will likely see indicators that a staff member is no longer contributing to your business. When the time comes to release a staff member from his/her duties, it is important that you handle the process in a professional manner. Remember, at the end of day, this is your business and your livelihood and you must protect those interests before anything else.

Make sure that you call the staff into the studio for their dismissal (if permissible) and be prepared to present them with a letter stating their termination. For meetings like this, it is helpful to have a non-partisan witness in the room.

Thus far, firing has been discussed as fairly commonplace; however, it certainly is not meant to detract from the seriousness of the issue. Letting a staff member go is not easy, but once the “letting go” has occurred, there have repeatedly been noticeable, positive changes in the studio.

Of course, the other side of firing personnel, especially in the dance studio business, is being prepared to handle the backlash. You have to explain the change to students and parents and must be prepared for any negative publicity/stories that the disgruntled employee spreads. One suggestion to make the process easier is to have a qualified, likable replacement ready to step into the vacant role (preferably immediately).

In addition to staff members being replaceable, it is also important to remember that studios and studio owners are replaceable, too. A client can choose to leave for another studio or another extracurricular. It is your responsibility to make sure you are doing everything in your power to run the best business possible.

Need to Review?

You can find the other two parts of the Dance Staff Management Guide here:

Dance Staff Management Guide: Part 1

Dance Studio Employee Handbook: Part 2

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Dance Teacher Salaries: How Much Should You Pay Dance Staff?

dance teacher salaries

Paying staff is also a hot topic of discussion for dance studios. There are the questions of dance teacher salaries versus hourly rates, and how much for each?

At The Dance Exec’s Studio, there are two salaried employees (the Business Manager and the Artistic Director). The remainder of the staff are paid on an hourly basis.

Our hourly employee rate begins at the baseline of what is commonly paid within our region. To increase pay from the baseline, we consider the following factors:

  1. Teaching Experience
  2. Education
  3. Performance Experience
  4. Commitment to the art of dance and teaching dance
  5. Loyalty/time with the studio

Yearly reviews are performed for staff members each season, and based on performance, staff members may be eligible for raises and/or bonuses.

Your studio should have a set pay schedule/calendar, and you should make sure checks are distributed in a timely, professional manner. If you are having employees submit time sheets, inform them of the expectations upfront and be prompt in delivering their paychecks.

Keeping Staff Engaged

Aside from regular pay, you must determine a way to keep your staff fresh, excited, and committed to your vision. To do this, we encourage employers to reward their staff members with things like:

  • Gifts of appreciation
  • Monetary bonuses
  • Annual opportunities for pay increase (if deserved)
  • Recognition within the studio
  • Inclusion to studio events/conventions/trips

Based on your budget, you may do one, some, or all of these, or you may choose a more homemade approach. Regardless of your approach, taking the time to say “thank you” goes long way in keeping your staff aligned with the culture of your dance studio.

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Dance Studio Business Plan: See A Real Example

dance studio business plan

Writing a dance studio business plan is a BIG project. But an important one! This plan will lay out your studio’s hopes and dreams, as well as the step-by-step process for getting from Point A to Point B. A few questions to ask yourself as you get started:

Where are you now?

Where do you want to be in three years? In five?

Who will help you get there?

The point of a dance studio business plan is to clearly lay out the aspects of a new company: strengths, challenges, and all of the minor details that will make the business a success. This document is an opportunity for entrepreneurs and hopeful business owners to put all of their ideas on paper, so that colleagues and other advisors can review the plan and offer any advice or criticism before the business is launched.

As an example, TutuTix has created a sample dance studio business plan without financial forecasts for our imaginary dance studio, TIPS (the TutuTix Imaginary Performance Studios).

Feel free to use our guide’s ideas in your own plan, and please send us feedback about ideas we might not have that work particularly well in your studio! You can download the example dance studio business plan for free by completing the form below:

The layout of a business plan follows a logical progression of topics that a company needs to have defined prior to opening for business.

That order of topics should look something like this:

Executive Summary

A concise description of your company, that acts as an overview of your goals and values. Keep it short but sweet! Why did you choose to build this kind of company?

Company Description

Here, you can flesh out your overview and touch on how your business will function. Talk a little about your customer base, marketing goals, and strengths of your company. Why are you the best? Is it because you have the best staff, the most experience, the best rates?

Market Analysis

Who are you competing against? How strong is that competition, and why do you think your studio can handle it? How will your business grow in this community over time?

There are lots of talented teachers and dancers who would be great studio owners. But in their current city or location, they would have a really hard time getting into the market and signing up students. That might be because of competition, lack of student interest in the area, or other reasons. How will your studio stand up to these tests?

Products and Services

Which dance classes will you offer? Will you rent out your space? Will you sell any retail items?

This section lists out your business functions: what do you offer, and how much will you charge? All of the items listed here will add up to be your studio’s income.

Marketing Publishing Strategy

How will people find out about your business, and how will you recruit additional students after your first season? What does your brand mean to you, and what do you want it to mean to others?

Operational Plan, Legal, and Startup Expenses

You can’t start a business from scratch: you’ll need funds and some professional consulting to get your company off the ground. How will you pay for your startup costs? Do you have that money already, or will you need to raise money with partners? Is a loan from the bank your best option?

By the time you get to writing this portion, hopefully you’ve talked to colleagues who might be opening the studio with you, or you’ve found a legal and/or financial professional who can advise you on the best way to move forward. Taking on debt to open a business is always risky, so you want to find funds the right way and have a plan to pay that debt back.

Most importantly: don’t be afraid to adapt! After the completion of the business plan, go back through and make adjustments based on information you’ve learned along the way! Ideas can and should evolve when they’re laid out on paper, so be sure to look for guidance from other teachers and business owners when putting together your plan.

TutuTix E-Book

This business plan is included in the FREE TutuTix E-Book, “Dance Studio Ideas and More: The Official TutuTix E-Book.” You can download our e-book here.

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Dance Studio Floor Plans: Part 2 of the Studio Start-Up Guide

dance studio floor plans

Once you find your ideal location, the next step is setting up the space and determining the best, most cost effective and functional way to fill the space. When you find your space, you will have a tangible element to begin constructing your dream and your studio. As mentioned before, the layout of your dance studio floor plans is critical to maximizing your business capabilities. Your design should be smart, sleek, and efficient.

Free Space vs Common Space

At The Dance Exec’s Studio as much space as possible was dedicated to actual dancing space.  Out of 4,200 square feet, about 1,050 square feet is dedicated to common spaces like a lobby, office, hallway, bathroom and storage space.  When designing your overall space keep in mind that about three-fourths of your space should be dedicated to income producing (danceable) space.

An important question to consider is: how much free space does a dancer need?  If there is a 1,000 square foot room, how many teenage dancers can fit into that room comfortably?

The Lobby

Lobby space should be minimal. The lobby does not need to be a large space for parents to loiter, as that encourages gossip and detracts from studio space. The Dance Exec’s Studio’s lobby is about 240 square feet and can accommodate 24 seated parents plus their children in laps during the transition times in between classes.

Sometimes, there are upward of 35 adults and their small children bustling through the lobby.  Though it is uncomfortable with that many people in the space, the way the dance studio floor plans were designed encourages people to be expeditious and transient.  You are running a dance education business, not a hang out spot for parents or idle students.

Other Spaces

Necessary spaces like office space, bathrooms, and hallways should be practical (often, minimum size is dictated by building codes), but should be kept as small as possible.

Dressing room areas should be large enough to accommodate a few changing students but should not be so large as to encourage students to loiter.  A student in the changing room should be there solely with the purpose of preparing for their next class (or storing a few items while they attend class).

Storage room should not be neglected in planning your space.  Storage should be large enough to keep all items for studio operations organized and out of sight.  Though very important, storage space too should not be huge and should be organized in a structured manner.

In creating your dance studio floor plans and finalizing a layout, maintaining dance space as the priority is key.  Homework areas and places to eat and hangout should be avoided.  Schedules should be planned in a way that students at the studio are there to take class.  If the time arises for activities such as a snack or homework, the lobby space should be sufficient to serve as a temporary spot for such tasks.

Studio Start-Up Guide

Part 1 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with the basics of Starting A Dance Studio.

Part 3 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with Dance Gear and Decorations.

For those of you getting serious about starting a dance studio or looking to make some big improvements, you can also download our NEW E-Book, “Dance Studio Ideas and More: The Official TutuTix E-Book” absolutely FREE!

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Dance Gear and Decorations: Part 3 of the Studio Start-Up Guide

dance gear and decorations

It’s important to think about all the different pieces of equipment and dance gear that will make up your dance studio space, because each feature has an important role. Whether it’s the height of the ceiling, deciding which of the dance floor types is most suitable, what kind of mirrors you’ll need, what kind of barre you’ll want, have a picture in mind of what you want your ideal school to look like (and have a budget ready to work with). And, make sure to have fun in your decorating; allow your personality and passion to shine!

Walls & Ceilings

When outfitting your space, it is helpful to install insulation in the walls to assist in reducing noise transfer between studio rooms.  It is not always required to install insulation in interior spaces, but this can be an inexpensive way to keep your space quieter (lobbies, bathrooms, if you have multiple rooms)

A high ceiling can make a space feel larger, and, conversely, a low ceiling can make a room feel smaller.  The Dance Exec’s Studio has 12-foot ceilings in the studio rooms, making the area feel open and spacious.  In comparison, some studios with lower ceilings and similar sized rooms do not feel nearly as large.

Some spaces will not be able to accommodate high ceilings, but you certainly want them to be as high as possible.  Ceiling materials can also affect noise transfer, so be sure to take that into consideration in your planning and product selection.

Flooring

The single most important feature in a dance studio is quite possibly the dance room floor.  Which of the dance floor types you select will largely be dictated by budget, but a nice sprung floor system can easily be constructed for around seven to nine dollars per square foot.

There are also several flooring companies that install dance floors, though their prices are considerably higher.  Sprung floors can greatly reduce risk of injury, and increase the overall health and well being of the instructors and dancers at your studio. For the health and longevity of your students and instructors, this is absolutely not a corner you can afford to cut.

There are several choices when it comes to dance floor types. What you choose will be dictated by your use of the dance room (ballet only, tap only, multipurpose floor, etc.).

Mirrors

The size of your studio’s mirrors can also make a big difference in how large a space appears.  The Dance Exec’s Studio has mirrors that are 8 feet high, which makes the space appear much larger than studios that opt to use 4 or 6-foot mirrors.

For walls with mirrors, it is important to have an open wall with minimal obstructions (electrical outlets, light switches, etc).  The cost of working around switches and outlets can significantly increase the cost of mirror installation.

Barres

There are several companies that sell wall and floor mounted barres. Wall mounted or floor mounted barres can be expensive, but are a great permanent installation for your space.  The Dance Exec’s Studio chose to use portable barres.  This allows barres to be pulled into the middle of the floor, and they can be oriented so they face the mirrors as well.

Portable barres are an optimal, flexible option for studio space.  They can be built with PVC piping or metal piping (iron or galvanized is a great option).  Your choice for barres will likely depend on your budget and how you would like to utilize your space.

Sound System

Your sound system selections should be professional, functioning, and appropriate for your studio space.

Sound systems should play CDs, iPods, iPads, laptops, etc. Make sure your equipment is up-to-date with the current technology.

Closed-Circuit Monitoring System & Options

Observation windows are likely the biggest deterrent from creating a focused learning environment for dance studio students. Younger students are easily distracted and will likely want to wave or blow kisses to their parents through the observation window.

The parents reciprocate communication, thinking it is cute without realizing that it is drawing every single students’ attention away from the reason they are there: to receive a dance education.  As the students age, they become self-conscious about being observed, which can be equally distracting.

In order to remedy this problem, The Dance Exec’s Studio installed a closed circuit monitoring system.  In the lobby, there are 4 flat screen, wall-mounted, television monitors.  Three of them display our three dance rooms, and parents have the ability to watch their students’ entire classes without creating a distraction.

On studio tours, this is pointed out as a huge selling point to increase focus in the classroom, while allowing parents to watch the entire class without crowding around an observation window.  It is a win-win for students, instructors and parents!  The other TV monitor is used to show DVDs of previous recitals, pictures of dancers put on DVD, or other items that can be further selling points to prospective parents.

***This is a project that you can accomplish independently. Several home security systems are built to provide closed circuit monitoring (you can even include digital recording options).  These systems are fairly inexpensive and relatively simple to install.  Security companies are also able to install a similar system, but are more expensive to hire.

Studio Security Options

You may choose to have a security system installed that has monitoring that is paid through a monthly fee.  If you are considering a closed circuit monitoring system, these can connect into one system that will provide your space with a heightened level of security to ease your mind and serve as a part of your parent observation system.

One thing that many studio owners do not consider is: “Who has a key to your studio?”  Inevitably, someone will wind up with a key, and you will wish they did not have one.  Even if they return the key, how do you know they did not have a copy made? Do you want to change the locks every time this happens?

The Dance Exec’s Studio has a keypad with a code that owners/employees have to type in that unlocks the door.  This was a relatively expensive installation fee upfront, but the functionality has made it worth the investment.  We never have to worry about having the locks changed for fear of someone having a key (or incur such an expense).  Changing the code to the front door is about a 2- minute process.

The front desk person is always present to allow parents to enter (by pressing a button that “buzzes” them in).  A doorbell was also installed for clients to ring in the event the front desk person has stepped away.  This may seem like overkill, but many daycares and preschools are implementing this level of security, so in many cases, parents in this area are familiar with the concept.  Hopefully, you have chosen a safe location, but this truly prevents people from entering your studio without someone in the building knowing that they are there.

This can be used as a selling point to parents as it also helps ensure that children are not running outside without a parent, and parents also know that you work hard to keep potentially unsafe people out of the studio.  At one point in The Dance Exec’s career (at another facility), someone came into the office (where staff members kept their purses during classes) and stole all of the purses.  A locked front door would have easily prevented this incident.

Please note that these systems run on electricity, so having a key backup is necessary in the case of a power outage or if the keypad entry system fails for some reason.

Décor

Select your décor, paint colors, and thematic concept to fit your niche market within the dance industry. If you are a training facility for children, make sure your look and set-up is reflective of your mission. If you are a classical ballet conservatory, make sure your look reflects that, too.

Studio Start-Up Guide

Part 1 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with the basics of Starting A Dance Studio.

Part 2 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with Dance Studio Floor Plans and layout design.

For those of you getting serious about starting a dance studio or looking to make some big improvements, you can also download our NEW E-Book, “Dance Studio Ideas and More: The Official TutuTix E-Book” absolutely FREE!

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Starting A Dance Studio: Part 1 of the Studio Start-Up Guide

starting a dance studio

Starting a dance studio (or relocating a studio) is certainly not an easy endeavor. It is a decision that should be thoroughly considered, weighed, and understood. Varying personal factors that should be considered are: personality type, business sense, life stability, income requirements, investment resources, personal willingness to commit, and a passion for business and/or dance. Most people would not open a clothing boutique if they did not love fashion, and the same should be said for dance studio entrepreneurs.

In starting a dance studio (or expanding your current studio), you must find your niche location and market. This section of the guide will cover all of the factors involved in choosing and up fitting a space for your current or prospective dance studio. In terms of your success, location is everything!

Finding Your Ideal Property

To begin searching for commercial property, it is a best practice to consult a commercial real estate agent. The agent will represent you and will protect your best interests throughout the process.

In searching for a prospective studio spot, it is important to consider the following items:

1. Location

How much space (think square footage) do you need for your dance studio? How much space can you support with your anticipated student base and financial resources? Will the studio be a one-room facility, or will it have multiple studio rooms?

In planning for the studio, consider the following spaces:

  • Lobby
  • Office
  • Storage
  • Bathrooms
  • Retail
  • Hallways

When looking at spaces and considering prospective floor plans and layouts, as much space as possible should be dedicated to the actual studio areas. This is the primary selling point of your facility and will be the most used, income producing space.

Is the space you are considering zoned for your intended use?  A real estate agent or landlord can clarify an area’s intended use and zoning.

Lobby space should be kept to a minimum. The lobby does not need to be a large space for parents to loiter, as that encourages gossip and detracts from studio space.

Office space, bathrooms, and storage should be kept to a minimum, but be sure that they are adequate enough to accommodate your needs.

2. Parking

Does the space have adequate parking to accommodate the number of clients you hope to have at your studio? Be mindful that you will likely need a spot for every person at your studio at any given time, including: students currently taking class, students transitioning to the next class, and staff vehicles.

The bottom line is that you need a spot for every single person that might be in attendance at the studio. Extra parking is always a plus—people will never complain if there are too many spaces, but there will be complaints if there is not enough parking.

You may also consider having a student drop off area, so parents can drop off and pick up students without utilizing a parking space.  In considering this option, you want to ensure that someone that may take too long in the drop off area will not interrupt the overall traffic flow.

A well-designed parking/drop off area can be one less thing for parents to stress about when coming to your studio.

3. Safety

Since dance studios frequently involve children, it is absolutely imperative to consider the safety (actual or perceived) of your location. Ask yourself if you would feel comfortable leaving your own child in a particular locale?

You can run the best studio in the world, but if it is not a great, safe location, people will hesitate to bring their children. This could cost you business! And, while the price of a less than desirable location may be appealing, this is not an area to skimp on your budget; rather, you should invest in being in a better part of town.

When considering locations, investigate your neighbors and see if that fits into your ideologies and overall theme. A great place for a primary location might be in an area with a fun park, a children’s preschool, and a music center. You would not want to open your facility in an area that was surrounded by bars or other non-child friendly venues. Be alert, and think of how parents may view your location and presentation.

4. Visibility

The cost of a visible location is expensive, and ultimately you will pay more rent. But, you will compensate the cost through blatant marketing. If your location is centered in an area that supports a lot of drive-by traffic, your facility will constantly be on the forefront of your community’s mind.

Keep in mind that convenience is a primary factor for people joining a dance studio (or any extracurricular activity). Make sure your locale is near prospective clients and reflects the mentality of the neighborhood. Some dancers will come to you because you run an excellent program and train great performers. But, the bulk of your students (and, consequently, your income) will result from people that are taking dance because your activity is convenient to their home.  Make sure that where you decide to put your studio is near a solid base of prospective clients.

Consider what nearby, prospective clients want in a space.  Are you near a country club with high expectations for their children’s extracurricular activities?  Be sure that your space reflects the mentality of the neighborhood and fits in with your potential client’s expectations. If a competitor (dance studio, gym or otherwise) has a considerably nicer or more visible facility, how are you planning on competing?

5. Nearby Anchors

As mentioned in the safety segment, knowing the businesses that surround you can greatly impact your business, positively or negatively. Know the resources that will be surrounding you and how you can use them to benefit your business. Being near a popular landmark can help your business when providing directions. Also, if you are near a school or another complimentary business to your target market, this can be highly beneficial. People appreciate surroundings that are familiar.

6. Feasibility of Meeting your Opening Goals / Timeline

It’s important to consult with your landlord/contractor to ensure that they can meet your opening goals with construction permitting, up fits, etc. It’s important to initiate the beginning phases of starting a dance studio with the highest levels of professionalism and organization.

The Bottom Line

Your dance studio’s outward appearance will make a huge impression on your clientele. Take the time to provide the best possible environment and regularly evaluate areas for potential improvement. Make sure your facility is cutting-edge, safe, and the appropriate environment for your dancers to thrive.

Studio Start-Up Guide

Want to learn more?

Part 2 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with Dance Studio Floor Plans and layout design.

Part 3 of the Studio Start-Up Guide deals with Dance Gear and Decorations.

For those of you getting serious about starting a dance studio or looking to make some big improvements, you can also download our FREE E-Book, “Dance Studio Ideas and More: The Official TutuTix E-Book!”

READ MORE +